1. LIBERAL MP FRANK VALERIOTE IS UNDER FIRE TODAY AFTER REPORTS THAT HIS CAMPAIGN SENT OUT ROBOCALLS IN GUELPH without identifying the source of the calls. Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister Dean Del Mastro attempted to paint the Liberals again as just as bad as the Conservatives on Friday while bringing to light information that Mr. Valeriote’s campaign sent out thousands of robocalls on election day that called on voters to make an informed decision but did not specify the source of the calls. Mr. Valeriote said that the robocalls were sent out as a “legal voice blast” to correct statements by the Conservative candidate concerning his stance on abortion. According to CRTC regulations on electronic telecommunications the recorded call must include call back information and the source of the call (i.e. the campaign it was coming from).
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Valeriote said the call was issue-based and not about suppressing votes. He added he spoke to Elections Canada about the call and the agency confirmed it complied with election law.
On Saturday, a spokesman for Elections Canada wouldn’t confirm whether the agency had spoken to Valeriote, but pointed to the laws on election advertising that say candidates or anyone acting on their behalf has to mention in the message that the ad is authorized by the campaign.

    LIBERAL MP FRANK VALERIOTE IS UNDER FIRE TODAY AFTER REPORTS THAT HIS CAMPAIGN SENT OUT ROBOCALLS IN GUELPH without identifying the source of the calls. Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister Dean Del Mastro attempted to paint the Liberals again as just as bad as the Conservatives on Friday while bringing to light information that Mr. Valeriote’s campaign sent out thousands of robocalls on election day that called on voters to make an informed decision but did not specify the source of the calls. Mr. Valeriote said that the robocalls were sent out as a “legal voice blast” to correct statements by the Conservative candidate concerning his stance on abortion. According to CRTC regulations on electronic telecommunications the recorded call must include call back information and the source of the call (i.e. the campaign it was coming from).

    (Click photo for full source article.)

    Valeriote said the call was issue-based and not about suppressing votes. He added he spoke to Elections Canada about the call and the agency confirmed it complied with election law.

    On Saturday, a spokesman for Elections Canada wouldn’t confirm whether the agency had spoken to Valeriote, but pointed to the laws on election advertising that say candidates or anyone acting on their behalf has to mention in the message that the ad is authorized by the campaign.